lee's classroom

(another MPPS global2.vic.edu.au weblog)

December 10, 2018
by leesclassroom
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Volume

Activity 1 (individually): 

  • Pretend to be an architect. Design as many buildings as you can, only using six 1 cm³ blocks (MAB blocks).
  • “Can you make one that takes up a bigger space than another”
  • “Can you make one that takes up a bigger space than others at your table?”
  • Take a walk around the room. “Who’s building takes up more space?”
  • Is a building 6 blocks high the same as a building 6 blocks long? What is similar and different about the buildings you have made?

Question (turn and talk): Which shape below takes up more space? Justify answer.

Related image

 

Definition: Volume is the amount of space a 3D object takes up.

 

Activity 2 (with a partner): 

  • Pretend to be an architect. Using ten 1 cm³ blocks (MAB blocks) design a building. Then one with 20 blocks, then one with 30 blocks. As you build each one compare it to others on your table.
  • Pick a simple rectangular object on your table, make a full scale copy of it with MAB. Compare it to other made at your table. Which has more volume (takes up more space)?

 

Extension activities:

Activity 3 (whole class): 

Activity 4 (with a partner): http://www.interactivestuff.org/sums4fun/3dboxes.html  (use real MAB to build what you see on screen if that helps you count how many are there)

Extension activities information (this is not required at your year level, but you can record it if you want)

How it is measured: Volume is measured in cubic units. For example a cubic cm block takes up 1 cubic cm. This is written as 1 cm³. Bigger objects may be measured in bigger units such as cubic meters, or m³

Pronounced: centimetres cubed or meters cubed.

The Formula: Volume = length x width x height.

 

Image result for perimeter area volume

 

September 10, 2018
by leesclassroom
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Identifying The Features Of Online Texts Lesson

In pairs explore these two texts.

  1. http://www.exploratorium.edu/frogs/index.html
  2. http://www.ginninderralandcare.org.au/sites/default/files/imported/res/Image/jpgs/Frogs%20of%20the%20ACT%20Region%20Poster.jpg

Students collect all of the facts that they can about frogs- they should colour code the facts according to the text that they get the information from.

 

Which text gave you better/ more information? 

What was different about reading the first text compared to the second? 

 

May 29, 2018
by leesclassroom
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Save The Egg Challenge

Today we begin working on our science project. Our challenge is – Can you design a bike or football helmet to withstand impact and reduce the likelihood of a brain injury? 

 

Students will be using their knowledge of forces acting on an object in a crash or fall, and apply a design process to develop a safe container for an egg that is dropped from a set height.

The design must:

  • Stay on the head.
  • Keep the skull from cracking.
  • Allow for the user to see through an opening at the front.
  • The helmet will be made from recycled materials.

Students will:

  • work in teams
  • solve design problems
  • make modifications, change ideas and maybe make
  • mistakes
  • use peer feedback to improve their designs using a design process like engineers and designers experiment, test, refine and try again

Throughout this process students will develop a folio of work that demonstrates their learning.

 

The two videos we looked at to help us understand why this is such an important issue were:

http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2986284.htm

http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s4716349.htm

(Two points to note:

  • Even if helmets are worn, they don’t completely eliminate the risk. They could give the player a false sense of security and they could put their body on the line even more.
  • This is why it is important to follow MPPS’ no tackling rule)

June 26, 2017
by leesclassroom
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Heat Unit: Resources and Holiday Experiments

Below I’ve listed some sites which might help with your PowerPoint. Beneath that are several heat and energy experiments you might be interested in doing during the holidays. Remember to always check with a parent before carrying out any experiments.

 

What is Heat? – Definition & Explanation

How Heat Energy Works.

What is Heat Energy? – Facts & Calculation

Forms of Energy: Thermal, Radiant, Chemical, Electric & Nuclear Energy

Energy Transfer: Examples & Overview

Mechanisms of Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection & Radiation

 

What is Conduction in Science? – Definition & Examples

What is Evaporation? – Definition & Examples

What is Temperature? – Definition & Measurement

Measuring Temperature in the Lab: Instruments & Process

 

Holiday experiments:

Water balloon and candle

Convection spiral

Why do temperature layers form in oceans

Does hot water freeze faster than cold water?

Pizza box solar oven

How to make honeycomb

Make a simple thermometer

Endothermic reaction

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