lee's classroom

(another MPPS global2.vic.edu.au weblog)

May 9, 2018
by leesclassroom
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Forces: Friction

Friction is a force between two surfaces when they are moving or sliding across each other. For example, when you try to push your hand across a table. Friction will make this difficult.

Friction works in the opposite direction to which the object is moving. Friction always slows a moving object down, and may even stop an object from moving.

The amount of friction depends the two surfaces.. The rougher the surface, the more friction, the smoother the surface, less friction.

Friction also produces heat. If you rub your hands together quickly, can you feel them get warmer?

The ways friction can help include:

  • preventing our shoes from slipping on the footpath when we walk
  • stopping car tyres from skidding on the road
  • allowing bicycle brakes to grip and slow or stop a turning wheel

Sometimes we want to reduce friction. For example, we use oil to reduce the friction between the moving parts inside a car engine. The oil holds the surfaces apart and can flow between them. The reduced friction means there is less wear on the car’s moving parts and less heat produced.

Ice causes very little friction, which is why it is easy to slip over on an icy day.

However, this is a good thing for ice skating and sledging.

 

 

 

Below are the videos we looked at in class:

Friction is a Force

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2gQs1mcZHA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybpFEB6Mt88

Floating Rice Bottle — How to Float Rice in a Bottle Science Experiment !!

 

Another resource is:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks2/science/physical_processes/friction/read/1/

 

April 30, 2018
by leesclassroom
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Forces: Movement, Direction and Shape

What makes our bikes go? what makes them stop when we brake? Why do apples fall from trees?

After our experiments today watch this video and read through the following information.

 

You have probably heard the word “force” before. Here are a few examples: “the rocket had a lot of force at blast off” or “the force of the storm blew the roof off the building.” What is force? Force is defined as a push or pull on an object.

 

When your foot pushes against the pedal of your bike the push makes the wheels of the bike move. When an apple falls from a tree, it is pulled to the ground by gravity.

Forces affect how objects move. They may cause motion; they may also slow, stop, or change the direction of motion of an object that is already moving.

Force can change a number of things about an object. They include:

  • direction
  • speed
  • both direction and speed
  • shape

Some examples of force changing the direction of an object.

  • A good soccer player can control the motion of a soccer ball by applying a force that changes the ball’s direction but not its speed.
  • Swinging a ball on a string around your head.

Some examples of force changing the direction and speed of an object.

  • A tennis player returning a very fast serve.
  • Starting on a swing.

Some examples of force changing the shape of an object.

  • A hammer beating a piece of metal.
  • A trampoline as someone jumps on it.

 

August 7, 2017
by leesclassroom
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Science Week Task

Last week we looked at the pieces of an apple to understand the ‘land where people can live, but do not necessarily grow the food needed for life’. (If you want to show your family this exercise go to: http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/socstud/frame_found_sr2/tns/tn-31.pdf)

As we peeled away the skin we learnt how small the amount of the Earth’s land is that is suitable to grow food.

For the next step we want you to reflect on the activity and describe what we all can do to help conserve and improve soils. The following films highlight the importance of good soil and the role of a soil scientist.

http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/media/104056/soil-healthy-dirt-makes-healthy-plants

https://open.abc.net.au/explore/44260

Schools can also play a part. Check out Darwin’s Girraween Primary School’s worm farm and how it has benefited their school. ‘How-to-Guide. Building a worm farm…it’s fun and easy!’.

For this year’s science week we want you to undertake some ‘scientific research’ in this important area of creating a more sustainable world. This means how do we use the Earth’s resources in a way that is fair, equal and will ensure they are there for future generations.

Think about Lucy’s world (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aQVQbGDojo&feature=youtu.be)

What solutions could you come up to attain a sustainable ‘Future Earth’ for children who live in places like Uganda. Ask yourself ‘What’s the one thing you would do to change the world and make it more sustainable?

Discuss the question with your family and friends, go online see what ideas others have. You’ll probably notice the different actions and responses could be grouped in areas similar to the following examples:

  • soil conservation ideas
  • water conservation ideas
  • sustainable ways to grow food
  • ideas to improve people’s health and well-being
  • ideas to change lives and the Earth

Using these ideas try to visualise a sustainable ‘Future Earth’. What might it look like? What might it sound like? How might it feel like?

What possible solutions can you come up with for achieving a sustainable ‘Future Earth’.

Finally we want you to present your solutions using a pop up display method called a ‘triorama’. Use this to tell others how they might help others work towards a sustainable ‘Future Earth’. In the top of the triorama your model a model to demonstrate, while at the base you place your words.

(Note: A simple triorama could consist of one triangle which shows one of your solutions. While you can also join four together to make a larger one showing several suggested solutions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYpRO6q3rX8)

June 28, 2017
by leesclassroom
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Term 2 Heat Project

In this term’s science unit the class has been learning about heat.

They have investigated how heat can be produced in many ways and can move from one object to another, the connection between the gain or loss of heat by an object and change in the temperature, and how heat can be transferred through direct contact or from a distance.

The have also explored the difference between heat and temperature, how a thermometer works and what is an insulator.

They have created PowerPoints containing much of what they have learnt. These can be found on the grade 4 blogs. Below are two examples made by teams of grade 3 students.

Heat by Thomas and Sanja

Heat by Liv and Antoinette

June 26, 2017
by leesclassroom
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Heat Unit: Resources and Holiday Experiments

Below I’ve listed some sites which might help with your PowerPoint. Beneath that are several heat and energy experiments you might be interested in doing during the holidays. Remember to always check with a parent before carrying out any experiments.

 

What is Heat? – Definition & Explanation

How Heat Energy Works.

What is Heat Energy? – Facts & Calculation

Forms of Energy: Thermal, Radiant, Chemical, Electric & Nuclear Energy

Energy Transfer: Examples & Overview

Mechanisms of Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection & Radiation

 

What is Conduction in Science? – Definition & Examples

What is Evaporation? – Definition & Examples

What is Temperature? – Definition & Measurement

Measuring Temperature in the Lab: Instruments & Process

 

Holiday experiments:

Water balloon and candle

Convection spiral

Why do temperature layers form in oceans

Does hot water freeze faster than cold water?

Pizza box solar oven

How to make honeycomb

Make a simple thermometer

Endothermic reaction

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