Aug
05

Filed Under (uncategorized) by on August 5, 2014
Aug
02
Filed Under (school news, science) by on August 2, 2014

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night is on again! The night is a part of the annual National Science Week which this year has the theme is ‘Food For Our Future: Science Feeding The World’. The theme was inspired by the International Year for Family Farming and besides the Science Fair students from all year levels will be having classes in our science lab investigating topics such as food security, agricultural sustainability and innovation. The night will include hands on activities, interesting exhibitions and a range of snack.

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

Date: Wednesday 17th September

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

Time: 6pm – 7.30pm

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

Location: Moonee Ponds Primary School Sports and Performance Centre

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

As well as being an opportunity to demonstrate various elements of MPPS’ science program the Science Fair will also be an opportunity for students to present science projects they have created at home. Jess, our science coordinator, has created a MPPS Science Fair blog that not only provides all the information about the night but also contains details about 6 different projects you can work on, with the goal of presenting your experiments and results at the Science Fair.

The annual Moonee Ponds Primary School Family Science Night

Jul
30
Filed Under (science) by on July 30, 2014

Yesterday we began our exploration of cyclones. We  ended the lesson filling out a world map, locating the regions where cyclones occur. You’ll need to complete this by Friday. Don’t forget to colour code these regions and make a key for your map. Also you’ll need to come to class ready to answer the following question:

“—Why do you think cyclones occur in those regions?

For today’s science lesson we will be working on develop an understanding of the features of cyclones. We will also be investigating the conditions necessary to form a cyclone.We’ll start with reading and taking notes from this document: asta_lesson 2 Background information about cyclones

To help record our notes from our readings we will be using a note taking method we’ve explored before, the Cornell Note Taking System. We will be going over it in class but to refresh your memory check out the following link: http://coe.jmu.edu/learningtoolbox/cornellnotes.html

 

If you want to further explore this area the following links will help:

About tropical cyclones,
Bureau of Meteorology. Information

Cyclones,
ClearlyExplained.com, Information and further resources

Cyclones – get the facts,
Attorney-General’s Department. Information

Cyclone Yasi from above,
Brisbane Times. Photo gallery

Hazards – cyclone,
Geoscience Australia. Information

Modelling tropical cyclones,
Bureau of Meteorology. Information and animations

Scientists release stunning satellite imagery of cyclone Yasi from space
(w/Video), Phys.org. Information and images

Severe tropical cyclone Yasi satellite loop,
Bureau of Meteorology. Animation

Tropical cyclones explained,
ABC News 02/02/2011

 

 

Jul
28

 

After much discussion we came up with the following definition of  ‘Extreme Weather Conditions':

Extreme weather is like regular weather only more intense. It occurs when normal weather conditions increase to potentially create a substantial amount of damage.

 

Some definitions on ‘Extreme Weather Conditions’ we came across include:

Extreme or severe weather is simply really bad weather or weather on a larger, more serious and devastating scale.

(http://www.econet.org.uk/weather/extreme.html)

Extreme weather includes unusual, severe or unseasonal weather; weather at the extremes of the historical distribution—the range that has been seen in the past.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extreme_weather)

Extreme weather is when a weather event is significantly different from the average or usual weather pattern. This may take place over one day or a period of time. A flash flood or heat wave are two examples of extreme weather in the UK.

(http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/geography/weather_climate/extreme_weather_rev1.shtml)

Jul
28
Filed Under (science) by on July 28, 2014

For today’s science lesson

For today’s science lesson we will be looking at developing a definition for the term ‘extreme weather’. I’ll then ask you to record your understanding of cyclones.

The following links will help:

Big picture: Cyclone Yasi strikes,
Brisbane Times. Images showing impact of Cyclone Yasi

Yasi hits north Queensland,
Brisbane Times. Tropical cyclone Yasi photos